Guillaume Dulude, PhD

Guillaume Dulude holds a PhD in neuropsychology and clinical psychology from the Université du Québec à Montréal on cognitive processes, attentional systems and consciousness. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in communication and business administration. He is also an international lecturer, author and university teacher, and a trainer specialized in communication strategies and the development…

Episode 8: The Mochens Of Thailand

Guillaume Dulude, PhD, travels to Thailand to meet the Moken. The ocean holds no secrets for these sea nomads; they know it like the back of their hand! They travel abroad Kabangs, their traditional boats, and go from bay to bay to gather and fish their food. Guillaume joins them in the middle of the rainy season as they search for islands to shelter on.

Episode 7: The Bakas Of Gabon

Back to Africa for Guillaume Dulude, PhD, who travels the world in search of the last nomadic peoples. This time, he seeks to unravel the mystery of these semi-nomadic people, once known as “pygmies” because of their small size. These little men of Africa are now fighting for their survival. It is for the richness of their culture and the particularities of their social codes that Guillaume wants to meet them.

Episode 6: The Orang Rimba Of Indonesia

In his mission to better understand the last nomadic peoples, explorer and neuropsychologist Guillaume Dulude travels to the center of Sumatra Island, Indonesia, to meet the Orang Rimba. Their name means “Men of the Jungle”. The tribe lives among the forest, for the forest, and in symbiosis with the forest. Their gods are linked to it, as well as their subsistence and their way of life. However, modernity and its pitfalls are catching up with them and threatening their survival. For several years, the palm oil trade has been responsible for the deforestation of this part of Indonesia. This oil, nicknamed “red gold”, is the most sold in the world and pushes the Orang Rimba to the limit.

Episode 5: The Ovahimbas Of Namibia

In keeping with his mission to find nomadic peoples, Guillaume Dulude, Ph.D., goes to meet the OvoHimbas, known as the “begging people ”. They move between Kaokoland, an arid region in northern Namibia, and the Kunene River, on the border with Angola. The OvoHimbas have kept their ancestral language and they refuse modernity. They also practice hunting. Social roles within the tribe are very traditional, and the role of women is of utmost importance. They do not wash themselves, but rather bathe in herbal smoke.

Episode 4: The Kyrgyz Of Kyrgyzstan

Neuropsychologist Guillaume Dulude explores the world in search of the last nomadic peoples. He arrives in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, a small country wedged between the Middle East, the Himalayas and the plains of Central Asia. Totally disoriented, Guillaume immediately feels the recent communist past of the country. It is on motorcycle that he will cross the mountains to the Kyrgyz land. Guillaume will be surprised by the freezing temperature as he travels to the high altitude to meet famous Kyrgyz horse breeders.

Episode 3: The Karos Of Ethiopia

The Karos are the smallest tribe in southern Ethiopia. This is the reason why the city’s urban planning is so important for the development of the city. This region would represent the basin of humanity. It was here that the skeleton of Lucy, an australopithecine over three million years old, was discovered.

Episode 1: The Hadzabe Of Tanzania

Guillaume Dulude, PhD, explores the world in search of the last nomadic peoples. He immerses us in the life of the Hadzabe, considered the last of the “First Men”. Settled in northeastern Tanzania for 40,000 years, their way of life reflects what life was like before the birth of agriculture 10,000 years ago.

Soutenance de thèse

«L’avenir du développement humain est d’amener la science dans la réalité.» En mai dernier, Dr. Guillaume Dulude a présenté sa soutenance de thèse de doctorat en neuropsychologie à l’Université de Québec à Montréal qui s’intitule: «Exploration des processus cognitifs non conscients dans le trouble obsessionnel compulsif».  Ce doctorat aura duré 11 ans. Un projet difficile et ambitieux étant donné…